The universe appears to expand at different rates, study reports

New measurements show that modern physics cannot succinctly understand the rate at which the universe expands.
By Joseph Scalise | Dec 13, 2018
Astronomers from John Hopkins University have found new evidence that furthers the idea that the universe expands at different speeds depending on what part is observed, according to new research inThe Astrophysical Journal.

Many recent studies on the topic have found numerous discrepancies in how fast the universe moves out to distant locations.

In fact, the "tension" could reveal that scientists need to revise the modern understanding of how physics structures the universe and change ideas surround dark matter and dark energy.

Measurements gathered from the Hubble and Gaia space telescopes revealed that the universe expands at a rate of 45.6 miles per second per megaparsec. In other words, every 3.3 million light-years a galaxy is away from Earth, it appears to move 45 miles faster.

However, previous research from the Planck telescope shows that the more distant background universe moves at a slower 41.6 miles per second per megaparsec.

The difference between both of those measurements continues to grow as researchers refine measurements over time. In fact, the data from the new study reveals a gap that is four times the size of their combined uncertainty -- a value that reflects researchers' level of confidence in the results of a trial.

"At this point, clearly it's not simply some gross error in any one measurement," said lead author Adam Riess, an astronomy and physics professor at Johns Hopkins University, in astatement. "It's as though you predicted how tall a child would become from a growth chart, and then found the adult he or she became greatly exceeded the prediction. We are very perplexed."

Nobody can explain why the universe accelerates as it expands. Some believe it may be the result of dark matter or dark energy, while others suggest that it may be the result of a yet undiscovered particle.

While researchers are still analyzing the measurements from the recent study, they will likely help scientists better predict how the early universe have evolved into the expansion rate noted today.

"The tension seems to have grown into a full-blown incompatibility between our views of the early and late time universe," added Riess, accordingThe Independent."At this point, clearly it's not simply some gross error in any one measurement.

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